Category Archives: Miscellany

Lillian Ross on Salinger

The New Yorker recently published a slide show featuring pictures of J. D. Salinger with Erik Ross (son of Lillian Ross), and with his own children. The photos are beautiful and show Salinger in a way the public rarely, if ever, saw him.

Perhaps even better is Ross’s piece on the Salinger she knew in which she reveals his love of children, Hitchcok’s The 39 Steps, and Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Ed. note: we do not own the rights to these photos, copyright and all other rights are the property of Lillian Ross, from whose personal collection the photographs were taken. Please visit the link above to view the photos. Enjoy!

Salinger in Central Park

Salinger in Central Park with Erik and Lillian Ross and with his children, Peggy and Matthew. Photo (c) The New Yorker, from the collection of Lillian Ross.

letters to jd salinger

Letters to J.D. Salinger edited by Chris Kubica and Will Hochman

MLA Citation:

Kubica, Chris, and Will Hochman. Letters to J.D. Salinger. Madison: University of Wisconsin, 2002. Print.

Book Jacket Copy:

“He published his only novel more than fifty years ago.  He has hardly been seen or heard from since 1965.  Most writers fitting such a description are long forgotten, but if the novel is The Catcher in the Rye and the writer is J.D. Salinger…well, he’s the stuff of legends, the most famously reclusive writer of the twentieth century.  If you could write to him, what would you say?

Salinger continues to maintain his silence, but Holden Caulfield, Fanny and Zooey, and Seymour Glass–the unforgettable characters of his novel and short stories–continue to speak to generations of readers and writers.  Letters to J.D. Salinger includes more than eighty personal letters addressed to Salinger from well-known writers, editors, critics, journalists, and other luminaries, as well as from students, teachers, and readers around the world, some of whom have just discovered Salinger for the first time.  Their voices testify to the lasting impression Salinger’s ideas and emotions have made on so many diverse lives.”